Innovation

When we are old, who takes care of us? Because in 30 years the demographic change will be in full swing: 6.1 million people in Germany who need to be cared for and too few people who look after them. That doesn't work. That means we need a solution! One option are robots in care. The Munich School of Robotics and Machine Intelligence team develop robots that could support and relieve the nursing staff. Beta stories shows in this documentary what robots can already do in care and why we will need care robots in the future.

Get the support you need to implement new effective ways of manufacturing with human-centric industrial robots on your production floor. The European-funded program SHOP4CF (Smart Human Oriented Platform for Connected Factories) offers €100,000 in equity-free funding, expert support, and tailored training sessions on technology, innovation, and finances to each of the winning teams. The call for applications will stay open until August 2021.

Reflexes protect our bodies – for example when we pull our hand back from a hot stove. These protective mechanisms could also be useful for robots. In this interview, Prof. Sami Haddadin and Johannes Kühn of the Munich School of Robotics and Machine Intelligence (MSRM) of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) explain why giving test subjects a “slap on the hand” could lay the foundations for the robots of the future.

Alexander König, founder of Reactive Robotics, talks about VEMO, a robot developed to help intensive care patients walk, and the cooperation with the MSRM

We have great news: Robothon® – The Grand Challenge 2021 as part of munich_i goes digital! Apply as a team until 23:59 CEST 30 April 2021 on our website at www.robothon-grand-challenge.com.

The “Modeling and Rehabilitation Robotics” research team developed a safe and minimalistic control and learning (AI) algorithm, which automatically finds and provides the optimal balance between rigid support and “soft” guidance for any given patient during therapy. This assist-as-needed (AAN) control strategy is being commercialized in collaboration with the high-tech startup Reactive Robotics and Schön Klinik Bad Aibling, as part of a robotic assistive device called VEMO, used for the early rehabilitation of ICU patients.

TUM Venture Labs aim to strengthen the startup ecosystem and attract more technological capital in the greater Munich area. The initiative offers educational programs, venturing support, and an ecosystem consisting of events, networks, and infrastructure that interdisciplinary teams can use to bring research results and ideas into a viable business venture. One of the many venture labs is the TUM Venture Lab Robotics/AI.

A team of researchers from the Munich School of Robotics and Machine Intelligence has developed a new early warning system for vehicles that uses artificial intelligence to learn from thousands of real traffic situations. A study of the system was carried out in cooperation with the BMW Group. The results show that, if used in today’s self-driving vehicles, it can warn seven seconds in advance against potentially critical situations that the cars cannot handle alone – with over 85% accuracy.

Dr. Günter Steinebach (internist) and Prof. Sami Haddadin explain for the science magazine "Xenius" on ARTE how the robot Garmi would support and companion elderly people in the future (minute 11:36-14:40).

The Geriatronics Research Center and LongLeif Robotics attract high-profile scientists and politicians at Garmisch-Partenkirchen. The robot ‘Garmi’ will allow the development of contactless diagnostics.